If you have a fire or water emergency, please call us now at (831) 275-1901

To have the optimal experience while using this site, you will need to update your browser. You may want to try one of the following alternatives:

Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

The Truth About Bleach

9/1/2017 (Permalink)

For many households, chlorine bleach is generally seen as your “go-to” cleaner for tough jobs.  While bleach is well-known for its disinfecting properties that doesn't mean it's the best choice for mold - it has distinct drawbacks when cleaning flood impacted buildings. It is a convenient cleaner and stain remover for hard, non-porous surfaces. Bleach is not made to “soak in”, therefore, its disinfecting properties are limited to a hard surface like tile or glass.  If used on porous materials, such as wood and drywall, bleach will stay above the surface and only kill the mold on the surface, while the water is absorbed in. The surface mold looks gone, but the fact is, if the mold is not removed from the material, it will most likely return and make your mold problem worse in the long run. Mold remediation requires a cleaner to reach deep down into wood and other porous building materials.  Further, its effectiveness in killing bacteria and mold is significantly reduced when it comes in contact with residual dirt, which is often present in flooded homes.  If bleach water comes into contact with electrical components and other metal parts of mechanical systems it can cause corrosion.  Bleach water can also compromise the effectiveness of termite treatments in the soil surrounding the building.  Many types of bleach are not EPA-registered as a disinfectant and may also be hazardous to your health.

Other News

View Recent Posts